Audio mediacoder download for windows 10

Mines of madness pdf download

Mines of Madness,Related Posts

Download Mines Of Madness Type: PDF Date: October Size: MB Author: NateNewlon This document was uploaded by user and they confirmed that they have the permission to Mines of Madness (Next) () - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. D&D 4e quest MINES OF MADNESS By Scott Kurtz & Christopher Perkins A REALLY FUN ADVENTURE (FOR THE DM, AT LEAST) The wizard Abracadamus hid the Forever Stone in the darkest depths of 6/11/ · Mines of Madness is a rollicking D&D® adventure designed was in the mine itself. for use with the D&D Next playtest packet, which you The elderly wizard, Abracadamus, was the [PDF] Mines of Madness - Free Download PDF DLSCRIB - Free, Fast and Secure Home Mines of Madness Mines of Madness Click the start the download DOWNLOAD PDF Report this ... read more

Buried in the ground beneath the outhouse is an empty wooden barrel to catch waste. Some anonymous miscreant threw an everburning torch into the barrel. The torch which produces no heat is the source of the light. The outhouse is large enough to accommodate one Medium character or two Small characters at a time. Creature: If one or more characters ignore the sign and enter the outhouse, the ground begins to tremble and bulge as the purple worm from area 32 erupts from below and swallows the outhouse. The worm is 50 feet long, but its lower half remains underground. Characters in the foot squares adjacent to the outhouse must succeed on a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw or fall prone. In this singular instance, the worm can bite multiple creatures with a single attack. Characters inside the outhouse T he Upper Level The following encounters are keyed to the map of the upper level.

Some characters might be tempted to explore the outhouse. If a character opens the door or peeks through a knothole in the wooden walls, read: 4 take a —5 penalty to this saving throw, and the worm has advantage on its attack roll to hit them. Roll initiative as normal, and track any damage the purple worm sustains; on its first turn after gaining surprise, the purple worm retreats the way it came, provoking opportunity attacks from characters adjacent to it as it backs into the earth. In addition to the outhouse, the worm also swallows the waste barrel and the everburning torch inside it. Worm Chute: The purple worm leaves behind a sinkhole of pulverized rock covering a lazily spiraling, corkscrew-like chute 10 feet wide and feet deep. The chute is plugged with 5 feet of pulverized rock, but the first character to enter or forcibly prod the sinkhole causes the fine rubble to give way, exposing the chute for all to see.

Characters who dare to slide down the chute arrive at the point marked X in area 32 on the lower level, landing atop a heap of powdered stone and taking no damage. Troubleshooting: This encounter sets the tone of the adventure. If the purple worm swallows one or more characters, resolve their fates quickly. In all likelihood, they are dead meat. Players who lose characters to the purple worm can remain in the game by choosing or rolling up new characters or renaming the ones they already have. Let them contrive an unlikely story to explain the sudden arrival of these new adventurers, then move on to the next encounter. Although they might seem to be circumventing the dungeon, characters using this backdoor route are confined to areas 29, 31, 32, and 33, with little hope of obtaining the Forever Stone.

Rabble in the Rubble: Four dead goblins are buried in the rubble flanking the entrance two per side. The mine entrance collapsed as the goblins made their way inside, and the survivors see area 3 stashed the bodies here after clearing the tunnel and looting the dead. Anyone who takes the time to search the rubble finds the dead goblins no check required. The corpses wear crushed bits of armor and have broken spears buried with them, but they carry nothing of value. A successful DC 10 Wisdom check reveals that they died from bludgeoning damage. Trap: Ten feet inside the tunnel, carved into the floor between two ceiling supports and hidden under a thin layer of dust, is a tiny rune composed of three Dwarvish letters. If the characters take the time to sweep aside the dust or cast a detect magic spell, they automatically detect the rune show the players HANDOUT 2 at this time. Otherwise, they have no chance of spotting it. The rune consists of the letters P, A, and X. Clearing the tunnel after a collapse takes 5 hours of work per foot square; each additional character reduces this time by 1 hour.

Entrance When the characters come within 30 feet of this room from any direction , they hear clucking and banging sounds. Pecking Order Rubble and flinders of rotten wood are piled around the mouth of a foot-wide, foot-high tunnel carved into a rocky hillside. The floor of the tunnel is covered in loose dust, and the wooden buttresses and crossbeams that support the tunnel ceiling have seen better days. This foot-high, rough-hewn chamber contains shovels, picks, stacks of wooden planks, buckets of nails, and piles of wooden beams amid three half-built wooden mine carts and three eerily lifelike statues of goblins brandishing spears. An intact cart rests upside-down in the middle of the cave, its wooden wheels sticking up in the air.

The entrance has collapsed several times, only to be cleared now and then by intrepid explorers eager to unearth the secrets and treasures beyond. The last group to enter the Mines of Madness was a gang of eight goblins. The four goblins that survived the tunnel collapse in area 2 eventually ran afoul of some cockatrices heh heh 5 4. Mine Shaft Braumordo and never made it out of this room. Three of the goblins were turned to stone, and the fourth is hiding beneath the overturned mine cart. Creatures: The four cockatrices are fixated on the overturned mine cart, allowing the characters the possibility of gaining surprise. If a character approaches within 10 feet of the beasts without succeeding on a Dexterity check to be stealthy, this chance for surprise is lost. The cockatrices are ill-tempered beasts and fight until slain. The lone surviving goblin cowers under the mine cart until a character lifts it, at which point he scampers out and attempts to run away.

If the characters are friendly toward him, he gladly fights by their side avoiding melee whenever possible. He speaks broken Common and Dwarvish, and he knows enough of the latter to translate the runes found throughout the mine. He gets his name from a natural tendency to hug others when scared. Roleplaying Notes: Hug Hug should be played as a likable character. He views his liberators as his best chance for survival but knows nothing about the Mines of Madness and makes a poor guide; he and his kin stumbled on the entrance and decided to investigate on a whim. Even if the adventurers might find him a useful companion, they could choose to sacrifice him in area 27 instead of another party member. If you roleplay Hug Hug well, it should be a heartbreaking decision for good-aligned characters to make.

Troubleshooting: If one or more characters are petrified by the cockatrices, you can add more live goblins to the encounter by giving Hug Hug a few friends and allowing players to run them as replacement characters. These goblins have the same statistics and gear as Hug Hug and remain under the mine cart until the cockatrices are defeated. The goblin adventurers are considerably weaker than the rest of the party, but that can make for a fun roleplaying challenge. The goblin players can name their new characters, choose alignments, and flesh out details and personalities as they see fit. Show the players HANDOUT 3 at this time. Dwarf characters know that dwarves like to name mine shafts after dwarven kings. You stand at the top of a foot-wide shaft of uncertain depth. Dangling above it from the ceiling is a rickety lift—a wooden framework with no walls and a floor made of dusty planks—fastened to a system of frayed ropes, iron pulleys, and stone counterweights.

The lift is nothing more than an 8-foot-byfoot-by-8foot box with no walls and a floor consisting of creaky wooden planks, the whole contraption held aloft by frayed ropes. A character inside the lift can raise or lower it at a rate of 10 feet per round by pulling on the ropes. The ropes suspending the lift can support up to three Medium characters and their gear. Two Small characters count as one Medium character in this regard. If any more characters move onto it, the contraption breaks loose and falls to the bottom of the shaft. Any character inside the lift when it plummets must make a DC 15 Dexterity check to find purchase on a nearby wall. If the save fails, the character falls and takes 21 6d6 bludgeoning damage.

The mine shaft is 60 feet deep and leads down to area Any creature that approaches within 5 feet of the secret door can make a DC 15 Intelligence or Wisdom check to detect its presence. It has no obvious way of being opened, however. If it is subjected to a detect magic spell, the door radiates powerful abjuration magic. Touching it dispels the stasis, whereupon the mimic produces a sticky pseudopod and attacks. This particular mimic cannot speak, and it fights until slain or until the characters flee. If the party flees rather than fights, the mimic moves elsewhere, assumes a new inanimate form for example, a wooden chest , and hides in plain sight. Cockatrice Nests The floor of this foot-high cave rises in the middle, creating a foot-high rocky shelf. Broken picks and shovels are haphazardly scattered about. One of the nests contains four speckled cockatrice eggs, and the other holds three. Characters can make a DC 13 Intelligence check to identify the eggs.

falls into the pit must make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw to avoid taking 1d6 bludgeoning damage and falling prone. Any character who lands in the pit stirs up a cloud of lime dust and must succeed on a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or be blinded for 1d6 rounds. Using water or alcohol to wash the eyes of a blinded character is a bad idea, because doing this turns the lime dust into a corrosive liquid, dealing 1d6 acid damage to the afflicted character and causing permanent blindness that can be cured only with a lesser restoration, greater restoration, or heal spell. Simply walking through the lime dust does not stir enough dust to cause blindness, but a character who is knocked prone in the pit must succeed on a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or be blinded for 1d6 rounds. Super Fun Happy Slide This dusty, foot-high cave contains several splintered cots and four intact but empty chicken coops.

Carved above a circular hole in the eastern wall are Dwarvish runes. The hole in the eastern wall is 3 feet in diameter and 2 feet above the floor; it forms the mouth of a polished stone chute that descends at a degree angle into darkness. If the characters inspect the runes above the hole in the wall, show the players HANDOUT 4. Those attempting a slow, careful descent must make a DC 20 Dexterity check to avoid slipping, with results on a failure as described above. Any character who lands in the pit stirs up a cloud of dust and must succeed on a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or be blinded for 1d6 rounds. Chicken Coops: The dwarves who lived in the mines liked to catch wild cockatrices and kept them in these wooden coops. The foreman, Pax Jaggershield, had a particular fondness for cockatrice eggs.

Days before his death, stricken with madness, he released his cockatrice captives. The ugly beasts have since made nests in area 6 and migrated to area 3. Wrath of Pax This is where Pax Jaggershield and most of his fellow miners met their end. This enormous, square room has smooth, brick-lined walls and a foot-high ceiling festooned with thick cobwebs. The floor is littered with tools and mining apparatus. More than a dozen animated dwarf skeletons wander about, pushing wooden mine carts, rolling barrels, and performing other chores under the supervision of a skeletal dwarf standing on a barrel and carrying a diamond-tipped pick. Equally spaced along the southern wall are three identical oaken doors with iron handles and hinges. The magical wards that Abracadamus placed throughout the mines, including scrying sensors, had an unintended side effect: They released arcane energies that drove the dwarves past the brink of madness so that they ultimately turned on one another.

Pax Jaggershield, the foreman, was convinced that the others were plotting to seize the mine and the Forever Stone for themselves, so he took care of business. After the murder and mayhem subsided, guilt and paranoia kept him from leaving the mines. He started eating rocks thinking they were cockatrice eggs and died a painful and ignoble death. If the characters are seen entering the room, a few skeletons run up to engage the enemy in melee combat while the rest hang back and throw axes. Finders keepers! The parchment is the deed to the 8. A Dash of Lime This cavernous pit has a foot-high ceiling and is 10 feet deeper than the floor in area 9.

Creatures: If a character moves more than 10 feet across the floor of the pit, he or she disturbs the bones underneath the lime dust, causing them to animate as five skeletal giant lizards imbued with evil dispositions. The skeletal lizards rise up out of the lime dust and try to gang up on single adversaries. If turned, they crawl up into area 9. The skeletal lizards are in no way troubled by the lime dust in the pit. Any battle here alerts the dwarf skeletons in area 9, which stand at the edge of the pit and hurl axes at the adventurers. Pit of Lime Dust: The mouth of the slide see area 7 is 5 feet above the pit floor. A character who slides or 7 Corkscrew Mines and is basically worthless although useful in dealing with the iron golem in area If it takes fire damage in excess of its hit points, the barrel explodes as though a fireball spell detonated in its space. Creatures in the foot-radius cloud must make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw.

Failed Save: 21 6d6 fire damage. Successful Save: Half damage. Characters who avoid damaging the barrel can take it with them; it weighs pounds. Doors: All three doors open into the room, and none of them are locked. Easternmost Door: This door opens to reveal a long, brick-walled tunnel see area 10 for details. A detect magic spell reveals a strong aura of transmutation magic on the door and in the hallway beyond. Middle Door: An iron spike is pounded into the floor in front of this door, and a detect magic spell reveals a strong aura of conjuration magic beyond the portal. Opening the door requires removing the spike first which requires an action and a DC 15 Strength check.

Beyond is an empty alcove. Any living creature that enters the alcove is instantly teleported to area 22 on the lower level no saving throw. Westernmost Door: The door opens to reveal a dusty tunnel containing two mine shafts see area 12 for details. A detect magic spell reveals no magical auras on the door or the area beyond. Treasure: Pax carries a diamond-tipped war pick worth 7, gp. It deals damage as a normal war pick. The pick can be used to appease the golem in area Endless Hallway This corridor has a floor composed of granite tiles and smooth walls made of mortared bricks. It stretches for 70 feet before ending at another door. Near the midpoint of the hall lie two moldering corpses. The corpses belong to a pair of adventurers—a male elf ranger and a male dwarf fighter. Close inspection of the scene reveals that the pair have been dead for a couple of weeks, as well as the following information. Cause of death: Duh.

Each shaft is 30 feet deep, and shining a light down either shaft reveals a wide passageway at the bottom of each, leading east. These deeper passages are dust-free and connect to form a U shape, as shown on the map. The ones across the northern shaft are strong enough to bear the weight of one Small creature at a time, but they snap under the weight of larger creatures. The planks that span the southern shaft cannot support any weight at all. Characters can replace the planks with sturdier materials found in areas 3 and 9, or elsewhere. Creature: A gelatinous cube resides in the U-shaped tunnel that connects the two mine shafts. It periodically moves from the bottom of one shaft to the other, cleaning the walls and floor of dust as it goes. When the characters first arrive, the cube is stationed at the bottom of the northernmost shaft, but at any time it can quietly relocate to the bottom of the southernmost shaft.

Any character who falls on top of the cube is automatically hit and engulfed by it, at which point the gelatinous cube moves eastward where it can consume its meal in peace. The gelatinous cube can force itself up a mine shaft, moving at half speed, to pursue fleeing prey. F The elf looks a bit hacked up, but the most grievous wound is a single arrow lodged in his head. Likely cause of death: Suicide. F The elf grasps a longbow. The dwarf clutches a bloodstained battleaxe. Whenever a character approaches a door face-first, the hallway magically lengthens, preventing the character or anyone else from reaching the door. Turning around means facing another enchanted door that moves farther away as one approaches it.

The faster a character approaches a door, the more length is added. To exit the hallway, a character must turn his or her back to a door and walk backward at it. Someone outside the hall can also open a door, ending the effect. The dwarf wears ordinary scale mail and wields a nonmagical battleaxe. In it, the elf mentions a quest to find the Forever Stone and his friendship with a dwarf named Helmut. Trapped in this dark, narrow hall with no means of escape. Helmut ate the last of my rations, and now he looks at me with hungry eyes. I think he plans to kill and eat me. Alas, I could never be so desperate. Eat a dwarf? Deep Moaning When the characters reach this curve in the tunnel, read the following: The tunnel forms a U shape as it curves back toward the north.

At the southernmost point on the curve, you hear a dreadful moaning sound coming from somewhere beyond the wall. Rough-Hewn Stairs These stairs descend 30 feet to area 24 on the lower level. They are dusty and uneven, but otherwise unremarkable. The moaning emanates from area 14, and the wall separating these two areas is thin enough to allow the noise to be heard in this tunnel. Characters who wish to investigate the moaning must break through the 1½-foot-thick stone wall using mining picks, plenty of which can be found in areas 3 and 9. It takes one character an hour to make a hole in the wall large enough for characters to squeeze through. A party of four characters can break through in 15 minutes. Mine Shafts Dezzyryn and Dolmark This stretch of tunnel crosses over two mine shafts spaced 10 feet apart.

Each gap is bridged by a pair of dusty wooden planks. Carved into a crossbeam above each shaft is a single word in Dwarvish script. Ode to Minecraft Deathstalkers: A deathstalker is a stumpy humanoid creature with no arms, four curvy legs, empty eye sockets, a mouth twisted into a sad expression, and greenish skin with gray spots. Deathstalkers move quietly and explode when they get close to one or more enemies. They are deathly afraid of cats and retreat back into the portal at the mere sight of one. Treasure: Each oink zombie carries a gold-bladed long sword that has an apparent value of 1, gp. but the sword turns to dust when exposed to sunlight. Troubleshooting: Any character who walks through the nether portal without so much as a rope to hang on to is dead meat, and the player gets to spend the remainder of the adventure reflecting on his or her poor judgment. Or, if you prefer, you can have the character stumble out of the portal 10 minutes later as an oink zombie.

An oink zombie adventurer retains its allegiance to the party and its statistics—except that it has only 1d8 hit points upon emerging from the portal but can spend Hit Dice normally , and its hit point maximum is permanently reduced by As a zombie, it is immune to disease and poison, cannot be put to sleep, and does not need to sleep, eat, or breathe. It is susceptible to turn undead effects, however. This cavern has been here since long before the mine. When the Glitterdark Mining Consortium began digging tunnels, the dwarves nearly broke into this chamber but wisely steered away from it, discouraged by the incessant moaning from within. Read the following if the characters break into this chamber: Beyond lies a dark, skull-shaped cave with a rounded ceiling 20 feet high. Rising up from the floor in the middle of the room is a freestanding, 9-foot-tall, rectangular archway of warped black stone filled with a glowing purple haze and snowflake-like particles.

The dread moaning issues from this sinister gateway. The portal is impervious to damage and far too strong to be dispelled by normal magic. Any character bold enough to step into the purple haze is grabbed by a multitude of rotting arms and pulled into this forsaken plane, never to be seen again. If the character is tied off with some sort of rope, he or she can be pulled back but is quickly followed by a mob of creatures see below. An object hurled through the portal vanishes and is lost forever. Hurling an illuminated object into the portal, such as a torch or a stone with a light spell cast on it, provokes the plane into sending creatures through the portal. The following round, on their own initiative count, four deathstalkers see below emerge from the portal. The round after that, an additional four deathstalkers emerge, acting on the same initiative count as the ones that came before them. Oink Zombies: These look like human zombies with patches of stitched pig flesh on their faces and bodies.

Once an oink zombie fixates on an enemy, it continues to fight that enemy until it or the enemy is slain. If one drops a character to 0 hit points in this cave, it spends its next turn dragging the character through the portal. Murder Ball The wizard Abracadamus worked with the dwarves to construct a nasty trap in this twisting tunnel, which descends from west to east at a steady angle. Trap: Set into an alcove at the western end of the tunnel is a foot-diameter ball of solid obsidian. When a creature crosses the line on the map marked with two triangles, a magical trigger releases the ball, which begins to roll down the tunnel. The ball does not stop until it reaches the empty alcove at the eastern end, whereupon it is teleported back to the western alcove at the top of the tunnel and there it remains until the trap is triggered again.

The trigger point cannot be detected, although a detect magic spell cast in the area reveals a faint yet indeterminate aura that suggests the tunnel is magically warded. The eastern alcove which is 60 feet lower than the western alcove radiates conjuration magic when scrutinized with a detect magic spell, but nothing else that enters the alcove is teleported—just the ball. When the giant obsidian ball is first released, characters in the tunnel can hear its bulk rolling toward them. The arrows on the map indicate which foot squares the ball occupies and the direction it moves as it rolls down the passageway. As soon as the ball is released, have the players roll initiative.

The ball acts on initiative counts 15 and 5, and on each of its turns it moves 10 squares. Every time the ball enters an occupied square, all creatures in that 10 square must make a DC 13 Dexterity saving throw as it rolls past or over! Failed Save: 22 4d10 bludgeoning damage, and the target falls prone. Successful Save: Half damage, and the target falls prone. A character can try to slow the ball by forgoing the Dexterity saving throw and instead making a DC 15 Strength saving throw. Regardless of the result, the character takes 22 4d10 bludgeoning damage and falls prone. The obsidian ball is too massive to be pinned in its alcove with iron spikes or a primitive barricade. Any creature in the western alcove when the ball is teleported back there must make a Dexterity saving throw, with the same results as those noted above. The shaft is 60 feet deep and leads down to area The wooden lift is intact and currently sits on the floor of the shaft. The lift is otherwise identical to the one in area 4.

In that case, refer to area 22 for more information on running the rust monster encounter. A Friendly Gesture The walls of this circular chamber are painted with a mural of marching dwarf miners. The dwarves continue their march down a curved staircase hewn from solid rock. Standing at the top of the stairs, facing north, is a life-sized statue of a grinning dwarf, his right arm outstretched as though ready to shake your hand. Show the players HANDOUT 7 at this time. The description of this area is the same as area 4: The spiraling staircase descends 30 feet to area Vondal Gorunn. Barar Anvilcaster. Send a PM to Bruno Find all posts by Bruno Arlan Windryver. Thelamir Attack of Opportunity. I never raise my voice or let my emotions control me. Ideal: Redemption. There's a spark of good in everyone. Bond: Someone I loved died because of a mistake I made. That will never happen again. Flaw: When I see something valuable, I can't think about anything but how to steal it.

Hook: Having overheard what he believes to be a grossly exaggerated tale in a tavern, Mentarn decides he must find out for himself. The Forever Stone is sure to fetch a pretty price, and may just be enough to cover his previous debts. Extra Info Hey, character sheet isn't quite complete, but I'll wait to see if my application is approved before I add in all the items I'm carrying and decide whether or not to spend my gold. Let me know if you want anything adjusted. Send a PM to Thelamir. Find all posts by Thelamir. Manithro Legendary Gazebo Slayer. They then considered blowing up the altar, the obsidian door, and the door that locked them in. Their various 'tests' of the room revealed that the doors and the altar shrugged off any force applied to them i.

Despite that , they still seriously considered using the blasting powder. I was secretly hoping they would! Grakas Jr. Everyone reached Abracadamus relatively intact. Dark green fabric overflowed from his lap and onto the floor. Abracadmus then threw the yarn at the adventurers and it coalesced into a poison-breathing green dragon. I explained about the basin full of blood, and several of the players went 'Oooohhhh! Get the newsletter. Subscribe to get the free product of the week! One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.

Log In with Facebook. Log In I am new here. Remember me. Error: No match for email address or password. Password forgotten? Click here. Advanced Search. Carved above a circular hole in the eastern wall are Dwarvish runes. The hole in the eastern wall is 3 feet in diameter and 2 feet above the floor; it forms the mouth of a polished stone chute that descends at a degree angle into darkness. If the characters inspect the runes above the hole in the wall, show the players HANDOUT 4. Those attempting a slow, careful descent must make a DC 20 Dexterity check to avoid slipping, with results on a failure as described above. Any character who lands in the pit stirs up a cloud of dust and must succeed on a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or be blinded for 1d6 rounds.

Chicken Coops: The dwarves who lived in the mines liked to catch wild cockatrices and kept them in these wooden coops. The foreman, Pax Jaggershield, had a particular fondness for cockatrice eggs. Days before his death, stricken with madness, he released his cockatrice captives. The ugly beasts have since made nests in area 6 and migrated to area 3. Wrath of Pax This is where Pax Jaggershield and most of his fellow miners met their end. This enormous, square room has smooth, brick-lined walls and a foot-high ceiling festooned with thick cobwebs. The floor is littered with tools and mining apparatus. More than a dozen animated dwarf skeletons wander about, pushing wooden mine carts, rolling barrels, and performing other chores under the supervision of a skeletal dwarf standing on a barrel and carrying a diamond-tipped pick.

Equally spaced along the southern wall are three identical oaken doors with iron handles and hinges. The magical wards that Abracadamus placed throughout the mines, including scrying sensors, had an unintended side effect: They released arcane energies that drove the dwarves past the brink of madness so that they ultimately turned on one another. Pax Jaggershield, the foreman, was convinced that the others were plotting to seize the mine and the Forever Stone for themselves, so he took care of business. After the murder and mayhem subsided, guilt and paranoia kept him from leaving the mines. He started eating rocks thinking they were cockatrice eggs and died a painful and ignoble death. If the characters are seen entering the room, a few skeletons run up to engage the enemy in melee combat while the rest hang back and throw axes.

Finders keepers! The parchment is the deed to the 8. A Dash of Lime This cavernous pit has a foot-high ceiling and is 10 feet deeper than the floor in area 9. Creatures: If a character moves more than 10 feet across the floor of the pit, he or she disturbs the bones underneath the lime dust, causing them to animate as five skeletal giant lizards imbued with evil dispositions. The skeletal lizards rise up out of the lime dust and try to gang up on single adversaries. If turned, they crawl up into area 9. The skeletal lizards are in no way troubled by the lime dust in the pit. Any battle here alerts the dwarf skeletons in area 9, which stand at the edge of the pit and hurl axes at the adventurers. Pit of Lime Dust: The mouth of the slide see area 7 is 5 feet above the pit floor. A character who slides or 7 Corkscrew Mines and is basically worthless although useful in dealing with the iron golem in area If it takes fire damage in excess of its hit points, the barrel explodes as though a fireball spell detonated in its space.

Creatures in the foot-radius cloud must make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw. Failed Save: 21 6d6 fire damage. Successful Save: Half damage. Characters who avoid damaging the barrel can take it with them; it weighs pounds. Doors: All three doors open into the room, and none of them are locked. Easternmost Door: This door opens to reveal a long, brick-walled tunnel see area 10 for details. A detect magic spell reveals a strong aura of transmutation magic on the door and in the hallway beyond. Middle Door: An iron spike is pounded into the floor in front of this door, and a detect magic spell reveals a strong aura of conjuration magic beyond the portal. Opening the door requires removing the spike first which requires an action and a DC 15 Strength check. Beyond is an empty alcove. Any living creature that enters the alcove is instantly teleported to area 22 on the lower level no saving throw.

Westernmost Door: The door opens to reveal a dusty tunnel containing two mine shafts see area 12 for details. A detect magic spell reveals no magical auras on the door or the area beyond. Treasure: Pax carries a diamond-tipped war pick worth 7, gp. It deals damage as a normal war pick. The pick can be used to appease the golem in area Endless Hallway This corridor has a floor composed of granite tiles and smooth walls made of mortared bricks. It stretches for 70 feet before ending at another door. Near the midpoint of the hall lie two moldering corpses.

The corpses belong to a pair of adventurers—a male elf ranger and a male dwarf fighter. Close inspection of the scene reveals that the pair have been dead for a couple of weeks, as well as the following information. Cause of death: Duh. Each shaft is 30 feet deep, and shining a light down either shaft reveals a wide passageway at the bottom of each, leading east. These deeper passages are dust-free and connect to form a U shape, as shown on the map. The ones across the northern shaft are strong enough to bear the weight of one Small creature at a time, but they snap under the weight of larger creatures. The planks that span the southern shaft cannot support any weight at all. Characters can replace the planks with sturdier materials found in areas 3 and 9, or elsewhere.

Creature: A gelatinous cube resides in the U-shaped tunnel that connects the two mine shafts. It periodically moves from the bottom of one shaft to the other, cleaning the walls and floor of dust as it goes. When the characters first arrive, the cube is stationed at the bottom of the northernmost shaft, but at any time it can quietly relocate to the bottom of the southernmost shaft. Any character who falls on top of the cube is automatically hit and engulfed by it, at which point the gelatinous cube moves eastward where it can consume its meal in peace.

The gelatinous cube can force itself up a mine shaft, moving at half speed, to pursue fleeing prey. F The elf looks a bit hacked up, but the most grievous wound is a single arrow lodged in his head. Likely cause of death: Suicide. F The elf grasps a longbow. The dwarf clutches a bloodstained battleaxe. Whenever a character approaches a door face-first, the hallway magically lengthens, preventing the character or anyone else from reaching the door. Turning around means facing another enchanted door that moves farther away as one approaches it. The faster a character approaches a door, the more length is added. To exit the hallway, a character must turn his or her back to a door and walk backward at it.

Someone outside the hall can also open a door, ending the effect. The dwarf wears ordinary scale mail and wields a nonmagical battleaxe. In it, the elf mentions a quest to find the Forever Stone and his friendship with a dwarf named Helmut. Trapped in this dark, narrow hall with no means of escape. Helmut ate the last of my rations, and now he looks at me with hungry eyes. I think he plans to kill and eat me. Alas, I could never be so desperate. Eat a dwarf? Deep Moaning When the characters reach this curve in the tunnel, read the following: The tunnel forms a U shape as it curves back toward the north. At the southernmost point on the curve, you hear a dreadful moaning sound coming from somewhere beyond the wall. Rough-Hewn Stairs These stairs descend 30 feet to area 24 on the lower level. They are dusty and uneven, but otherwise unremarkable. The moaning emanates from area 14, and the wall separating these two areas is thin enough to allow the noise to be heard in this tunnel.

Characters who wish to investigate the moaning must break through the 1½-foot-thick stone wall using mining picks, plenty of which can be found in areas 3 and 9. It takes one character an hour to make a hole in the wall large enough for characters to squeeze through. A party of four characters can break through in 15 minutes. Mine Shafts Dezzyryn and Dolmark This stretch of tunnel crosses over two mine shafts spaced 10 feet apart. Each gap is bridged by a pair of dusty wooden planks. Carved into a crossbeam above each shaft is a single word in Dwarvish script. Ode to Minecraft Deathstalkers: A deathstalker is a stumpy humanoid creature with no arms, four curvy legs, empty eye sockets, a mouth twisted into a sad expression, and greenish skin with gray spots.

Deathstalkers move quietly and explode when they get close to one or more enemies. They are deathly afraid of cats and retreat back into the portal at the mere sight of one. Treasure: Each oink zombie carries a gold-bladed long sword that has an apparent value of 1, gp. but the sword turns to dust when exposed to sunlight. Troubleshooting: Any character who walks through the nether portal without so much as a rope to hang on to is dead meat, and the player gets to spend the remainder of the adventure reflecting on his or her poor judgment. Or, if you prefer, you can have the character stumble out of the portal 10 minutes later as an oink zombie.

An oink zombie adventurer retains its allegiance to the party and its statistics—except that it has only 1d8 hit points upon emerging from the portal but can spend Hit Dice normally , and its hit point maximum is permanently reduced by As a zombie, it is immune to disease and poison, cannot be put to sleep, and does not need to sleep, eat, or breathe. It is susceptible to turn undead effects, however. This cavern has been here since long before the mine. When the Glitterdark Mining Consortium began digging tunnels, the dwarves nearly broke into this chamber but wisely steered away from it, discouraged by the incessant moaning from within.

Read the following if the characters break into this chamber: Beyond lies a dark, skull-shaped cave with a rounded ceiling 20 feet high. Rising up from the floor in the middle of the room is a freestanding, 9-foot-tall, rectangular archway of warped black stone filled with a glowing purple haze and snowflake-like particles. The dread moaning issues from this sinister gateway. The portal is impervious to damage and far too strong to be dispelled by normal magic. Any character bold enough to step into the purple haze is grabbed by a multitude of rotting arms and pulled into this forsaken plane, never to be seen again. If the character is tied off with some sort of rope, he or she can be pulled back but is quickly followed by a mob of creatures see below.

An object hurled through the portal vanishes and is lost forever. Hurling an illuminated object into the portal, such as a torch or a stone with a light spell cast on it, provokes the plane into sending creatures through the portal. The following round, on their own initiative count, four deathstalkers see below emerge from the portal. The round after that, an additional four deathstalkers emerge, acting on the same initiative count as the ones that came before them. Oink Zombies: These look like human zombies with patches of stitched pig flesh on their faces and bodies. Once an oink zombie fixates on an enemy, it continues to fight that enemy until it or the enemy is slain. If one drops a character to 0 hit points in this cave, it spends its next turn dragging the character through the portal.

Murder Ball The wizard Abracadamus worked with the dwarves to construct a nasty trap in this twisting tunnel, which descends from west to east at a steady angle. Trap: Set into an alcove at the western end of the tunnel is a foot-diameter ball of solid obsidian. When a creature crosses the line on the map marked with two triangles, a magical trigger releases the ball, which begins to roll down the tunnel. The ball does not stop until it reaches the empty alcove at the eastern end, whereupon it is teleported back to the western alcove at the top of the tunnel and there it remains until the trap is triggered again. The trigger point cannot be detected, although a detect magic spell cast in the area reveals a faint yet indeterminate aura that suggests the tunnel is magically warded. The eastern alcove which is 60 feet lower than the western alcove radiates conjuration magic when scrutinized with a detect magic spell, but nothing else that enters the alcove is teleported—just the ball.

When the giant obsidian ball is first released, characters in the tunnel can hear its bulk rolling toward them. The arrows on the map indicate which foot squares the ball occupies and the direction it moves as it rolls down the passageway. As soon as the ball is released, have the players roll initiative. The ball acts on initiative counts 15 and 5, and on each of its turns it moves 10 squares. Every time the ball enters an occupied square, all creatures in that 10 square must make a DC 13 Dexterity saving throw as it rolls past or over! Failed Save: 22 4d10 bludgeoning damage, and the target falls prone. Successful Save: Half damage, and the target falls prone. A character can try to slow the ball by forgoing the Dexterity saving throw and instead making a DC 15 Strength saving throw. Regardless of the result, the character takes 22 4d10 bludgeoning damage and falls prone. The obsidian ball is too massive to be pinned in its alcove with iron spikes or a primitive barricade.

Any creature in the western alcove when the ball is teleported back there must make a Dexterity saving throw, with the same results as those noted above. The shaft is 60 feet deep and leads down to area The wooden lift is intact and currently sits on the floor of the shaft. The lift is otherwise identical to the one in area 4. In that case, refer to area 22 for more information on running the rust monster encounter. A Friendly Gesture The walls of this circular chamber are painted with a mural of marching dwarf miners. The dwarves continue their march down a curved staircase hewn from solid rock. Standing at the top of the stairs, facing north, is a life-sized statue of a grinning dwarf, his right arm outstretched as though ready to shake your hand. Show the players HANDOUT 7 at this time. The description of this area is the same as area 4: The spiraling staircase descends 30 feet to area The marching dwarf mural ends at the bottom of the stairs.

Dwarf Statue: A detect magic spell reveals a strong transmutation aura on the statue. The statue is clearly a carving and not a petrified dwarf, and it can be knocked over with a DC 18 Strength check; doing so causes it to break into several pieces. Once the statue is broken, it loses its magical properties. If the character is a dwarf or good-aligned, add 10 to the die result add 20 if the character is both. If the character is evil, subtract 50 from the die result. You stand at the top of a foot-wide mine shaft of uncertain depth. Dangling from its roof is a rickety lift—a wooden framework with no walls and a floor made of dusty planks—fastened to a system of frayed ropes, iron pulleys, and stone counterweights. A character who inspects the lift closely can detect the rotten floor with a DC 10 Wisdom check. Characters who want to descend the shaft are better off climbing down the ropes.

If two or more Small characters or one or more Medium characters step onto the lift, the wooden floor falls away, and everyone in the lift must make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw to avoid falling 60 feet to the bottom of the shaft, taking 21 6d6 bludgeoning damage on impact. The statue can spew only one such ring. After the ring is given, roll a d4 instead of a d6 to determine the treasure result. Show the players HANDOUT 8 at this time. Loose ropes hang from rusted pulleys mounted to the roof of this otherwise empty mine shaft. A spell cast upon the room prevents detect magic spells from functioning within its confines. The gem is a combination permanent illusion and continual light spell, and any attempt to grab or move it fails.

Trap: If a creature comes within 10 feet of the gem, hundreds of crystal spikes protrude from holes in the ceiling as a reverse gravity spell kicks in. All creatures in the room except levitating or flying ones fall toward the ceiling and must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw. Failed Save: 7 2d6 bludgeoning damage from the upward fall plus 3 1d6 piercing damage from a crystal spike. Successful Save: 7 2d6 bludgeoning damage from the upward fall, but no damage from the spikes. The reverse gravity effect does not persist for more than a couple of seconds.

Then the crystal spikes retract into their holes, and creatures on the ceiling fall to the floor, taking another 7 2d6 bludgeoning damage automatically no save. When the trap triggers, the skeleton in chain mail on the floor falls up toward the ceiling and back down again, and the impact scatters its bones across the room. The gem does not move. Only a character who happens to be spider climbing or levitating when the trap triggers avoids taking damage. Once it is triggered, the reverse gravity trap requires 24 hours to reset. The skeleton also has a small pouch containing five 50 gp gems identical to the ones spewed by the statue in area The following encounters are keyed to the map of the lower level. Dead characters can stay dead. A corkscrewing flight of rough-hewn stairs ascends 60 feet to area The outer wall of the staircase is painted with a colorful mural that depicts dwarf miners marching down the stairs in single file.

The mural ends at the bottom of the staircase. The plain stone door has a handle and hinges on this side, and it pulls open with some effort. The door is trapped, and the trap cannot be disabled or dispelled. The door frame radiates a faint evocation aura under a detect magic spell. Trap: Any character who steps through the doorway without smiling takes 3 1d6 lightning damage. A smiling character does not trigger the trap. There is no smiling dwarf face above the other side of the door to give friendly warning to those coming from the north. Thrown Up The doors leading to this room are made of plain stone and do not have handles on the sides that face the room.

They can be pushed outward. When either door is opened, read the following: Beyond the door is a landing with a short flight of stone steps leading down to the floor of a circular room with smooth walls and a foot-high ceiling. Colored stone tiles set into the floor form an abstract pattern, and resting in the middle of the room is a brightly glowing gem as big as a fist. Lying next to it is a humanoid skeleton clad in golden chain mail, one bony hand reaching for the gem. A short sword and shield rest nearby. Rotted Backpack This rough-hewn tunnel junction sits at the bottom of a foot mine shaft leading up to area See that entry for information about the lift.

Lying in the western alcove is a rotted backpack. Treasure: The backpack was left here by a long-dead adventurer and contains a potion of climbing, three potions of healing, a potion of invisibility, and a scroll with the knock spell written on it. All of the potions are labeled in Elvish. Any attempt to lift the backpack causes the potions to tear through the bottom and smash upon the floor. A character can save one of the potions with a successful DC 15 Dexterity saving throw. Smashed potions cannot be salvaged. If one or more players declare that their characters are inspecting the ceiling, add: The ceiling is perforated with tiny holes, each no more than an inch in diameter. Rust Monster Lair d6 1 2 3 4 5 6 A wooden lift sits at the bottom of a foot mine shaft leading up to area The lift works just like the one in area 4. Characters teleported to this location from area 9 appear in the southern alcove marked X on the map.

The teleportation is one-way only. This junction located at the base of a mine shaft is braced with rotted wooden beams and strewn with rubble. Here and there, you see the wooden handles of old picks and shovels, their metal parts missing. The spirit has the equivalent of 10 hit points for determining whether the attempt is successful or not. Creature: A pair of ravenous rust monsters inhabits this rubble-strewn corner of the mines. They have already devoured all the metal in the area and focus their attacks on characters wearing metal armor or wielding metal weapons. Hammer Time You come to a long, narrow landing between two rough-hewn flights of stairs. Between the staircases, carved into the wall, is a rectangular niche containing an iron hammer hanging from a hook. The hammer is sealed behind a pane of glass, and engraved above the niche are some words in Dwarvish script.

Show the players HANDOUT 9 at this time. The tunnel ahead continues well beyond the shaft. IN CASE OF BERSERK GOLEM BREAK GLASS Trap: The glass pane has AC 0 and 1 hp. If it is broken by anyone other than a dwarf, a glyph of warding is triggered. The magical trap can be detected with a detect magic spell or a DC 17 Intelligence check and, once detected, disabled with a DC 12 Dexterity check failure by 5 or more triggers the trap. If the trap triggers, all creatures in the foot square in front of the niche must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw. Failed Save: 10 3d6 lightning damage. In addition, whenever it scores a hit against the grinning iron golem in area 28, the golem is stunned for 1 minute. This special property affects the golem in area 28 only, not all iron golems. The shaft plunges 80 feet, and the beams are sturdy and wide enough to allow for safe crossing without the need for ability checks.

At the bottom of the shaft is a jagged pile of wood and iron that used to be some sort of scaffold. Anyone that falls down the shaft takes 28 8d6 bludgeoning damage from the fall plus 7 2d6 piercing damage from the wreckage. A dwarf miner died here long ago after his scaffold collapsed, and though his remains were recovered and buried elsewhere, his spirit lingers. Unable to lay the spirit to rest, the dwarves were forced to abandon the mine shaft. Nothing happens when the first character crosses the shaft, but when the next character in line begins to cross, read the following: One Good Turn. A loud voice echoes from below. Its mouth forms a 3-foot-wide hole that passes all the way through the 6-inch-thick portal.

This document was uploaded by user and they confirmed that they have the permission to share it. If you are author or own the copyright of this book, please report to us by using this DMCA report form. Report DMCA. Home current Explore. Home Mines Of Madness Mines Of Madness Uploaded by: NateNewlon 0 0 October PDF Bookmark Embed Share Print Download. Words: 20, Pages: Then he died, as all good wizards do. To date, only one stalwart band has plunged into the Mines of Madness and lived to tell the tale. We seriously doubt it, but go ahead. prove us wrong! Introduction magical value at all; the wizard had lied to the dwarves and had no real interest in the red crystal. His interest was in the mine itself. The elderly wizard, Abracadamus, was the last surviving member of a secret society of do-gooders sworn to protect the Forever Stone and other good-aligned artifacts from the forces of evil.

He had used the artifact to prolong his own life for that is its greatest power , but he was tired of being hunted. He urged the dwarves to make several expansions to the mines and helped them rig a series of deadly traps to discourage intrusion. Pax Jaggershield and his dwarves, rich on the money given to them by the wizard, chose to stay and guard the mines. They were convinced that Abracadamus and his treasures were worth protecting. After a few months, however, the dwarves succumbed to a strange madness. A handful of them longed to retrieve and sell whatever the wizard was hiding.

Greed and paranoia led to violence and betrayal, until only Jaggershield himself was left standing. Still, he refused to leave the mine, and there he died. Since then, bands of adventurers have entered the Mines of Madness in search of the fabled Forever Stone, only to meet similar fates. The adventure is intended for four 3rd-level characters, created using the rules in the playtest packet. But if the players band together and use their brains, with a little luck their characters might survive to tell the tale of how they descended into the Mines of Madness in search of the Forever Stone and prevailed. Deep within, the dwarves unearthed veins of a never-before-seen red crystal they took to calling krimsonite. Unfortunately, the substance was difficult to extract and turned brittle once separated from the indigenous rock upon which it grew. The consortium tried to market the crystal and failed horribly. A mine foreman named Pax Jaggershield had invested his life savings in the mines.

Stubborn yet persuasive, he refused to sell his shares and foolishly, some say convinced his fellow miners to help him buy the rest. By delving ever deeper, Jaggershield hoped to strike electrum a few flecks of the precious metal had been found here and there , but instead broke into a tunnel complex inhabited by a purple worm. He told them that krimsonite dust was valuable as a spell component. The dwarves, encouraged by the news, worked feverishly to provide the wizard with all the krimsonite he could afford. In fact, the ore had no What the Players Need To K now Read the following to begin the adventure: You have come to the Mines of Madness in search of the Forever Stone, a powerful artifact rumored to have many great powers, first among them the power to grant eternal life. According to half-forgotten lore, the stone was hidden from the world long ago by evil wizards and greedy dwarves who coveted its power.

They are said to have perished in an orgy of magic and bloodshed after turning on one another. To survive the Mines of Madness would be a feather in the cap of any adventurer, but to retrieve the Forever Stone would catapult you into the annals of awesomeness. And so here you are, on the brink of greatness, ready to descend into the depths in search of glory, infamy, and immortality. It also assumes that the party has discovered the location of the Mines of Madness and made its way there. The adventure begins with the characters standing at the entrance, preparing to make their descent into history. Speaking of history, characters can attempt to recall certain supposed facts about the Mines of Madness by making a DC 20 Intelligence check.

A successful check yields one random bit of information; have the succeeding player roll a d4, and then consult the table below. In game terms, any adventurer who takes a long rest in the Mines of Madness does not regain spent Hit Dice. Common Features d4 Detail 1 The mines are rumored to contain veins of electrum. Scale: The maps use a scale of 10 feet per square. Lighting: All areas within the mines are unlit unless noted otherwise. Characters must rely on darkvision or their own light sources to see. Ceilings and Walls: Unless noted otherwise, rooms have flat, foot-high ceilings and are chiseled from solid stone, and the walls have few handholds or footholds; they can be climbed with a DC 20 Strength or Dexterity check.

Natural caverns vary in height and have frequent hand- and footholds, but the walls are slick with moisture; climbing the walls in these locations requires a DC 15 Strength or Dexterity check, and failure by 5 or more results in a fall 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet fallen. Mine Shafts: Dwarves like to name mine shafts after dwarven kings. The named mine shafts in the Mines of Madness vary in depth, but all are lined with rotting support beams and crossbeams that offer plenty of handholds. Climbing up or down a shaft requires a DC 12 Strength or Dexterity check, with a failure by 5 or more indicating a fall 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet fallen. Tunnels: All tunnels are 10 feet high and hewn from dense earth and solid rock. At various weak points, rotting wooden buttresses and crossbeams support the tunnel walls and ceiling.

Corkscrew Tunnels: Some tunnels coil upward or downward, increasing or decreasing their depth by 30 feet. The floors of these corkscrew tunnels are usually angled no more than 20 degrees. Tunnel Collapse: A typical buttress has AC 0 and 10 hit points. Destroying a buttress has a 1-in-6 chance of causing a ceiling collapse in the two foot squares closest to it. Any creature in a collapsing section of tunnel must make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw. On a successful save, the target moves out of the collapsing area to the nearest safe square. On a failed save, the target takes 7 2d6 bludgeoning damage, falls prone, and is Welcome to the Mines The Mines of Madness contain traps and dangers aplenty.

Please read the adventure thoroughly before attempting to run it, and refer to the maps of the upper and lower levels as needed. Read-Aloud Text: Boxed text gives players information about what their characters can see, hear, and perhaps smell when they enter a given area. This text can be read aloud to players or paraphrased as you see fit. Monster Statistics: For your convenience, monster statistics are collected at the end of the adventure on pages keyed to the encounter areas described below.

Each combat encounter comes with an initiative tracker and spaces to record monster hit points. Dwarvish Runes: The mines are riddled with Dwarvish script carved into walls, doors, and other surfaces. If the party tries to decipher the script, you can give HANDOUT 1 a translation of the Dwarvish alphabet to any player whose character speaks Dwarvish or casts a comprehend languages spell. Troubleshooting: Some encounters are especially dangerous. While buried, the target is restrained and cannot stand, and the only action it can take on its turn is to make a DC 10 Strength check to escape, taking a penalty to the check equal to the number of feet of rubble covering it. An unburied creature adjacent to the target can attempt to pull it free as an action by making a similar Strength check. Inside the outhouse is a wooden bench with a hole cut into it. Flickering orange light shows through the hole, emanating from somewhere deep below.

Buried in the ground beneath the outhouse is an empty wooden barrel to catch waste. Some anonymous miscreant threw an everburning torch into the barrel. The torch which produces no heat is the source of the light. The outhouse is large enough to accommodate one Medium character or two Small characters at a time. Creature: If one or more characters ignore the sign and enter the outhouse, the ground begins to tremble and bulge as the purple worm from area 32 erupts from below and swallows the outhouse. The worm is 50 feet long, but its lower half remains underground. Characters in the foot squares adjacent to the outhouse must succeed on a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw or fall prone.

In this singular instance, the worm can bite multiple creatures with a single attack. Characters inside the outhouse T he Upper Level The following encounters are keyed to the map of the upper level. Some characters might be tempted to explore the outhouse. If a character opens the door or peeks through a knothole in the wooden walls, read: 4 take a —5 penalty to this saving throw, and the worm has advantage on its attack roll to hit them. Roll initiative as normal, and track any damage the purple worm sustains; on its first turn after gaining surprise, the purple worm retreats the way it came, provoking opportunity attacks from characters adjacent to it as it backs into the earth. In addition to the outhouse, the worm also swallows the waste barrel and the everburning torch inside it. Worm Chute: The purple worm leaves behind a sinkhole of pulverized rock covering a lazily spiraling, corkscrew-like chute 10 feet wide and feet deep.

The chute is plugged with 5 feet of pulverized rock, but the first character to enter or forcibly prod the sinkhole causes the fine rubble to give way, exposing the chute for all to see. Characters who dare to slide down the chute arrive at the point marked X in area 32 on the lower level, landing atop a heap of powdered stone and taking no damage. Troubleshooting: This encounter sets the tone of the adventure. If the purple worm swallows one or more characters, resolve their fates quickly. In all likelihood, they are dead meat. Players who lose characters to the purple worm can remain in the game by choosing or rolling up new characters or renaming the ones they already have. Let them contrive an unlikely story to explain the sudden arrival of these new adventurers, then move on to the next encounter.

Although they might seem to be circumventing the dungeon, characters using this backdoor route are confined to areas 29, 31, 32, and 33, with little hope of obtaining the Forever Stone. Rabble in the Rubble: Four dead goblins are buried in the rubble flanking the entrance two per side. The mine entrance collapsed as the goblins made their way inside, and the survivors see area 3 stashed the bodies here after clearing the tunnel and looting the dead. Anyone who takes the time to search the rubble finds the dead goblins no check required. The corpses wear crushed bits of armor and have broken spears buried with them, but they carry nothing of value. A successful DC 10 Wisdom check reveals that they died from bludgeoning damage.

Mines of Madness,

WebMines of Madness removed from dmsguild? It was a free download on blogger.com, suggested by this post to new players. But sometime between when that was posted and Check 5th Edition - Mines of Madness from DnDArchive here. Like 5th Edition - Mines of Madness? Just add 5th Edition - Mines of Madness of DnDArchive to My Favorites. Embed WebCheck 5th Edition - Mines of Madness from DnDArchive here. Like 5th Edition - Mines of Madness? Just add 5th Edition - Mines of Madness of DnDArchive to My Favorites. WebMINES OF MADNESS By Scott Kurtz & Christopher Perkins A REALLY FUN ADVENTURE (FOR THE DM, AT LEAST) The wizard Abracadamus hid the Forever Stone in the WebDOWNLOAD PDF. This book is written for the Dungeon Master. It contains a complete Dungeons & Dragons adventure, as well as descriptions for every creature and magic MINES OF MADNESS By Scott Kurtz & Christopher Perkins A REALLY FUN ADVENTURE (FOR THE DM, AT LEAST) The wizard Abracadamus hid the Forever Stone in the darkest depths of ... read more

A Friendly Gesture The walls of this circular chamber are painted with a mural of marching dwarf miners. We're sorry This title is not available. The mine entrance collapsed as the goblins made their way inside, and the survivors see area 3 stashed the bodies here after clearing the tunnel and looting the dead. Vulnerability: The skeleton is vulnerable to bludgeoning damage. Trap: Any character who steps through the doorway without smiling takes 3 1d6 lightning damage.

Flaw: When I see something valuable, I can't think about anything but how to steal it. At the far end of the eastern tunnel, half-buried in debris, is a small corpse clad in torn leather armor, clutching a rusted lantern in one hand and a gleaming short sword in the other. The goblin adventurers are considerably weaker than the rest of the mines of madness pdf download, but that can make for a fun roleplaying challenge. Almost anything can be found in the city and with ships loading and unloading and construction going around the clock, there is a job for seemingly everyone. If the green dragon is released, roll initiative for both it and the crypt thing. A DC 15 Strength or Dexterity check is needed to climb up or down the chute, mines of madness pdf download, and failure by 5 or more results in a fall but no damage, since the corkscrewing chute and the mound of powdered stone soften the impact. but the sword turns to dust when exposed to sunlight.

Categories: